As Kneaded Bakery specializes in naturally leavened sourdough loaves, classic French baguettes, and challah. We also offer a range of noshes (Yiddish for "snacks"), which highlight a variety of doughs, both sweet and savory, from cultures around the world. We are ALWAYS working hard to develop new loaves. In the meantime, below is the list of the current standards and fan favorites, along with ingredient and nutrition information.

Curious about what sourdough is and why it’s so darn special? Scroll down below for some sourdough FAQs!

At this time, As Kneaded Bakery does not offer any breads that are gluten free. 

OUR BREADS

OUR NOSHES

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Bialy: A chewy and airy relative of the bagel with a center chock full of onions and poppy seeds.

Dough ingredients: Wheat flour, water, malted wheat flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour), sea salt, yeast. Topping ingredients: Onion, poppy seeds, olive oil.

Bostock: A delectable morning "pastry": a thick cut piece of our Challah, drizzled with simple syrup, seasonal jam, in-house almond frangipane, and topped with sliced almonds. Baked to perfection.

Dough ingredients: Wheat flour, water, eggs, sugar, oil, sea salt, yeast. Topping ingredients: Seasonal jam (rotating), almonds, white sugar, butter, eggs, simple syrup (sugar, water), sea salt.

Morning Bun: A rich brioche dough swirled with a heavenly filling made from butter, honey, brown sugar, and spices.

Dough ingredients: Wheat flour, eggs, butter, whole milk, white sugar, sea salt, yeast. Filling ingredients: Butter, honey, brown sugar, cinnamon.

THE BEAUTY & BENEFITS OF SOURDOUGH

What makes sourdough different? Sourdough breads get their rise from the use of a starter, also known as a levain or natural leavening, rather than commercial yeast.

What is sourdough starter? A starter is a fermented mixture of flour and water, or sometimes another liquid. It contains wild yeast and bacteria, which naturally occur in flour and our environment. According to one study, a single teaspoon of starter contains nearly 50 million wild yeasts and 5 billion bacteria! The fermentation processes that occur in the starter ultimately produce carbon dioxide gas, which in turn creates air bubbles in our doughs, causing them to rise.

Are all starters the same? Unlike commercial yeast, which all comes from a single species, the characteristics of sourdough starters can vary widely. Factors that can set a starter apart include the ratio of flour and water used, how it’s stored, or the way it’s refreshed or “fed” over time. These differences help make the sourdough universe as diverse as it is delicious!

Is sourdough better for you? The combination of a long fermentation process with the presence of wild yeasts and bacteria is known to imbue sourdough with a few health perks:

  1. Lower glycemic index: Compared to breads baked with commercial yeast, sourdough produces a more gradual and less extreme increase in blood sugar.

  2. More nutrient-rich: The lactic acid produced by the starter helps decrease the presence of another type of acid, phytic acid, that interferes with nutrient absorption. As Kneaded sourdough is made even more nutrient-rich by our heavy reliance on whole grains!

  3. Easier to digest: Although there is a lack of scientific consensus on this one, many people report finding sourdough easier to digest. This may be due to the probiotic qualities of the starter, which are similar to those found in other fermented foods.

  4. Fewer additives: Sourdough can naturally last several days on your counter or shelf (and months more in your freezer!) without requiring any of the preservatives found in other store-bought breads. Because sourdough has naturally complex flavors, it also does not require the refined sugars and other additives used to artificially add more flavor to other commercial breads.

Are all of As Kneaded’s breads sourdough? No, because although we love sourdough and its unique benefits and characteristics, we believe some breads simply taste better without it. This is especially true of the traditional Parisienne baguette, which we absolutely, positively believe—and recently told San Francisco Magazine—should never be made with sourdough.


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